Stephen Anderson – From Paths to Sandboxes

Sat in on Karl Fast and Stephen Anderson‘s Design for Understanding workshop at the IA Summit last week, and it was double-plus-good.

Here are Stephen’s slides from his IA Summit presentation.  Excellent stuff relating to autonomy in learning environments, and multitudes more:

Immersive Learning

I have this great little shelf in the bookshelf app on my ipad.  It’s just books by people I know.  I feel genuinely privileged to know so many people with so many interesting things to say.

Some of them are drafts for books that are still in progress., but one that’s already out in the world is Koreen Pagano’s Immersive Learning: Designing for Authentic Practice:

immersive learning

It’s great, for a few different reasons:

Reason 1: The subtitle — Designing for Authentic Practice.  So immersive learning environments can sometimes be shiny objects.  Remember when everything L&D was going to start happening in Second Life?  Yep, that didn’t happen.

One of the reason’s it didn’t happen was because there was because the focus was on the technology (“Ooo – we can build a virtual replica of our corporate university!”) and not on the really interesting part — the possibility for high-context practice. We remember more if we learn something in the same environment where we will use the information, so virtual worlds were interesting for that reason, but that got lost in the hype cycle. Koreen rightly focuses on the real purpose for immersive learning – high-context practice environments.  It’s about the practice, not the technology.

Reason 2: The case studies – So, one of the problems with a lot of L&D books is that they are more about what can be done, rather than examples of what has been done. This naturally happens with new technologies.  When they were brand new, both mobile and xAPI have had to start with the possibilities rather than real examples, until some critical mass built, allowing for case examples.

Immersive learning suffered similarly for a long time, but if anybody is able to speak from direct experiences, it’s Koreen.  The book is worth it for the case studies alone. Lots of really good examples of use, with the kind of nitty gritty details you need to help inform your own practice.

Reason 3: Underwear Gnomes — how can you not love a book that starts with a really well-played South Park reference?  It’s indicative of Koreen’s overall accessible, entertaining style, which makes the book a really pleasurable read.

 

 

 

 

Manifestos and MCQs

Hey folks,

So a couple of quick things.  A few of us launched this today: http://elearningmanifesto.org/ — would love to know if it seems useful :)

And second, I was collecting some resources on writing good multiple choice questions (which is really hard), and thought they might be useful to post here

Will Thalheimer has some things on his site – mostly shorter job aids:
He also wrote three articles on scenario-based questions that are here:
Cathy Moore also has some good blog posts:
A number of universities have guidelines for their faculty — you can probably find several by googling.  For example:

 

Libraries and Hyperbolic Discounting and Carrots

So I’ve been blogging, just not here:

typewriter

 

For ASTD, I wrote about why we aren’t in the information delivery business anymore (and what we can learn from Museums and Libraries):

http://www.astd.org/Publications/Blogs/Learning-Technologies-Blog/2013/11/The-Future-of-LD-Is-Not-the-Information-Business

For Allen Interactions, I wrote a guest blog about hyperbolic discounting, and why creating a feeling of immediacy is a necessary instructional design skill:

http://info.alleninteractions.com/bid/99811/An-e-Learning-Challenge-Why-Should-You-Care-Right-Now

For Inside Learning Technologies, I wrote about our responsibilities for motivating learners (and why it’s not just about carrot-like rewards):

http://viewer.zmags.co.uk/publication/e49b92f9#/e49b92f9/20

(The last one is based pretty heavily on a blog post that was posted here a while back)

And, as a bonus link, I was reminded of Cathy Moore’s L&D manifesto the other day, and I think I should just link to it weekly because it’s that great. I can take no credit for this one, other than to say “Yeah! That!! YEAH!”:

http://blog.cathy-moore.com/2013/06/learning-development-people-unite/

Design For How People Learn in Chinese

So, apparently there’s a chinese version of Design For How People Learn, which is delightful.

chinese_dfhpl_cover

 

Apparently when you take a Cammy Bean quote, translate it into Chinese, and then let google translate turn it back into English, you get this marvelous wisdom:

‘If you let me fall in love with a book, then I would deeply in love with this present. Julie Dirksen prepared for the beginner a most excellent book, so that they can be like the old bird as instructional design. “

- Cammy Bean, Kineo, vice president of learning design 

How great is that?  Be like the old bird, people.

Coming up next: A Russian version in September :)

Update – here’s the Russian Version available for pre-order:

russian_dfhpl_cover

 

There’s no Cammy Bean quote, but run the title through Google Translate and it comes out:

“Art of teaching - How do any training not boring and effective.”

Well, okay then.

Gameful Learning – More Sebastian Deterding Goodness

Okay, so I understand that it looks like I just post every Sebastian Deterding presentation on this blog, but really, I don’t.  He’s a prolific guy.  This one is specifically aimed at design for online learning, so it’s double-plus-good, and therefore must be posted here:

Social Norms -or- Hey, What are they doing over there?

I’m working on a change management presentation, and have been looking for some of the social norms research – especially at the practice of using messages that help people understand that the majority of the group is already doing the desired behavior.

Before I close the tabs, I thought I’d collect the most interesting links here (that’s all I have time for today!).

socialproof

Wikipedia entry (which defines it, and rightly points out that outcomes are uneven for this approach) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_norms_approach

Environmental behaviors and social norms (This is a nice summary paper of using social norms in environmental campaigns, influencing behaviors like littering) - http://195.37.26.249/ijsc/docs/artikel/03/3_03_IJSC_Research_Griskevicius.pdf

Thermostats with social feedback (This is one of the actual papers on this pretty widely known example) - http://www.carlsonschool.umn.edu/assets/118375.pdf

Social norms and teen smoking (And feet. An interesting television commercial aimed at social norms and teen smoking) - http://nudges.org/2011/06/14/new-social-norm-campaign-on-teen-smoking-in-texas/

Social norms and tax compliance (using a general appeal vs a social norm appeal to improve tax compliance) - http://www.socialnorms.org/CaseStudies/taxcompliance.php

More social norms and tax compliance (HBR article, though you need registration/subscription to see the whole thing) - http://hbr.org/2012/10/98-of-hbr-readers-love-this-article/ar/1

Social norms and binge drinking (a write up of one of the earlier studies that looked at perceived and actual norms for college students’ drinking behaviors) - http://socialnorms.org/pdf/socnormapproach.pdf

 

Usable Learning Busy-ness

Hey folks — am returned from all the San Francisco adventures, and am happy to be home.

Bay Bridge

Now that I have time to draw breath, I’ll actually finish some of those blog posts, but  here’s a round up of stuff that’s been going on, in no particular order:

  • Just got back from a busy week at ASTD ICE (did a certificate workshop, two panels, speed-mentoring, planning committee meetings and a session) and it was lovely to see and meet so many people. I mentioned that I did a webinar earlier in the week (a shorter version of my session on game design for learning), and if you missed it (and are interested), there’s a recording here.
  • Just arranged to do a half-day workshop for UX Week in SF August 21-22 on Change Management.  Really excited about this one :)

As soon as I post this, I’ll remember six more things, but that’s what the edit button is for, right?

Update: YES – HERE IS THE THING I FORGOT:

  • ELearning Guild Thought Leaders Webinar on June 11th, 10:30 PT/1:30 ET – the topic will be Design for Behavior Change – registration info here

Webcast: Using the Psychology of Games for Learning

I should have posted this a few days ago, but I’m doing a webcast tomorrow (Wednesday May 15th, 1pm ET) for ASTD on using the psychology of game design for learning.  Talking about some familiar stuff (flow, hyperbolic discounting) and a few new things (visceral feedback).  Not sure if you need to be an ASTD member to attend, but I *think* you can just sign up:

http://webcasts.astd.org/webinar/731#.UZKUcU7gd84.twitter

 

Virtual Chainsaws (When it’s not a knowledge problem)

Just wrote a piece for the Research for Practitioners series over at Learning Solutions Magazine on some really fascinating research at the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab.  It’s crazy interesting research, and it involves virtual chainsaws, behavior change and crafty research techniques. What’s not to love in that?

Go check it out here: Research for Practitioners: When It’s Not a Knowledge Problem

chainsaw